Sumidagawa river bridges in Tokyo



Bridges map of the Sumidagawa

During my visit in Tokyo in 2017 I boarded a cruise ship on the Sumida river at Azumabashi bridge headed for Odaiba Seaside park. In the park I found this nice stylized map showing all the bridges crossing the Sumida river, as well as all the cruises that can be made on the river and in Tokyo bay. Most of the photos on this page were taken after boarding another cruise ship heading back upstream from Odaiba Seaside park to Azumabashi bridge.

All the photos on this page can be clicked and clicked again to obtain larger and even larger views of the bridges.



Tsukuda Ohashi bridge

Tsukuda Ōhashi bridge (佃大橋, which translates into “Cultivated rice field bridge”) dating from 1964, was the first bridge built after World War II, crossing the river from Tsukiji to Tsukishima.



Chuo Ohashi bridge

Chūō Ōhashi bridge (中央大橋, which translates into “Center bridge”) dating from 1994 is the most recently built of the bridges across the Sumida.



Eitai bashi bridge

Eitai bridge (永代橋, which translates into “Perpetual bridge”) dates from 1924 and replaces a bridge built in 1696.



Kyosu bridge

Kiyosuhashi bridge (清洲橋, which translates into something like “Clean island bridge”) was built in 1928 and links Kiyosu with Nihonbashi-Nakasu.



Shin Ohashi bridge

Shin Ōhashi bridge (新木橋, which translates into “New bridge”) dates from 1976 and replaced a bridge built in 1693.



Ryogoku bashi bridge

Ryōgoku bridge (両国橋, which translates into “Both provinces bridge”) is the oldest of the bridges that cross the Sumida river. It was finished in 1659 and was the first bridge to be built across the Sumida river after the great Mereiki fire in 1657 and was about 175 meters long. The current bridge dates from 1932, replacing the bridge built in 1659.



Shin Yanagi bridge

Just north of Ryōgoku bridge on the west bank is Yanagi bridge (柳橋, meaning “Willow bridge”). It crosses the mouth of the Kanda river where this flows into the Sumida river. The original wooden bridge was replaced with an iron bridge in 1895. This was replaced again in 1929 with the current iron bridge.



Kuramae bashi bridge

Kuramaebashi bridge (蔵前橋, which translates into something like “Former storehouse bridge”) was built in 1924. The name of the bridge refers to the rice granaries of the shōgun located in the Edo period on the west bank here.



Umaya bashi bridge

Umaya hashi bridge (厩橋, which translates into “Stable bridge”) dates from 1929, and replaced a bridge built in 1875. The latter again replaced the Onmaya ferry bringing people across the Sumida in Edo times at this point. The name of the bridge refers to the fact that the shōgun once had horse stables on the west bank here.



Komagata bashi bridge

Komagata hashi bridge (駒形橋, which literally translates into “Hall with statues in the form of a poney bridge”) dates from 1927 and takes its name from the Komagata temple dedicated to bodhisattva Kannon in the form of a horse head located on the west bank at the end of this bridge.



Azuma bridge

Azumabashi bridge (吾妻橋) dating from 1931 replaced the former Ōkawa bridge (大川橋, “Large river bridge”) which was first built in 1774.



Makura bridge

Just north of Azuma bridge on the east bank is Makura bridge (枕橋, which translates into “Pillow bridge”). It crosses the mouth of a water flowing into the Sumida river at this point.



Kototoi bridge

Kototoibashi bridge (言問橋), dating from 1928, was reconstructed at the location of the bridge which linked two nearby temples. These are the Mimeguri shrine located on the east- and the Matsuchiyama Shōden shrine located on the westbank of the Sumida river, respectively.


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